Vegetable Container Gardening

Tips and Tricks for Vegetable Container Gardening Enthusiasts

Seeding and Transplanting Your Vegetable Container Garden April 3, 2008

baby-plants.jpgPhoto courtesy of http://www.PDPhoto.org

So you’ve gotten all your raw materials (containers, soil, seeds, etc) and you’re raring to get your vegetable container garden started. One way for an easy start is to get some seedlings or clippings from your local nursery or garden center and plant them, as they are, into some small containers. This is a really good option if you are starting slightly behind the optimum time of year to germinate seeds. If it’s warm enough, you can also put your vegetable plants outside right away. However, pay close attention to the weather and environment, your seedlings probably won’t survive a late frost, pouring rain, burning sun rays or animals munching on them.

Other people like to watch plants turn from seeds into tiny baby plants right in front of their eyes. I have to say it is quite magical, seeing those tiny green sprouts against the soft black dirt. If you do decide to choose this route, here are a few important things to consider.

Read the seed packages carefully and follow the sowing directions. Not all seeds are equal, some have more specific needs than others. Cover the seeds with about ¼ inch to ½ inch of soil. You want to provide enough soil to allow for proper germination, but you don’t want the soil to be too heavy so that they have to struggle too hard to break the surface.

Start your seeds in a warm area. The best place is probably indoors – they are safe from the elements and animals, and you can maintain a constant temperature. I usually wait about 4 to 8 weeks before I transplant the seedlings, depending on their size and sturdiness. Another way to tell if the seedlings are ready to transplant is when they have 2 to 3 leaves on them.

If you are planting several varieties of vegetables at the same time, you will want to label each kind. I like using those little colored dot stickers. I write the name of the plant on each one, or use a different color for each kind.

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